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The Female Hero Archetype: Raise your SMV by acting out your Hero Archetype [Hero's journey]

The Female Hero Archetype: Raise your SMV by acting out your Hero Archetype [Hero's journey]

Men and women are fundamentally and biologically different. That's no surprise, they have very different roles and purposes to fulfill in the continuation of our species. Listening to stories and emulating heroes that display positive, natural gender roles can help us to be better men and women. In this post we will discuss the Female Hero Archetype, how it has been distorted and how we can select positive female role models.

Beware of false narratives

A whole set of false narratives are used by the mass media to propagandize women. These lies are the biggest threat to western civilization that we face. Exposing these lies and telling the truth is vital to rebuilding ourselves and our culture.

The false female hero archetype that is often portrayed in modern books, movies and television shows is toxic to true femininity. It's a false narrative that harms both men and women by distorting healthy gender roles and attraction. This drives a wedge between men and women, unnaturally pitting them against each other. It causes both genders to pursue paths that lower their Sexual Market Value. Since we have all been exposed to these narratives, we all need to unlearn them.

A man with boobs

Violent, aggressive, dominant, masculine characters such as Wonder Woman, Rey (Star Wars), Ellen Ripley (Alien), Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games), Lara Croft (Tomb Raider), Xena and many more portray the Female Hero Archetype as a man with no penis and boobs. 

These female “heroes” don't need no man. Perhaps even worse, they are portrayed as Mary Sue characters, perfect in every, unable to fail without having to really try. They can easily beat men twice their size and possessing far more experience. Their only feminine characteristics are an exaggerated sexual appearance.

The masculinity of these “females” distorts women's view of themselves. Women who regularly expose themselves to these unhealthy role models are pressured to take on masculine traits.

The unrealistic depictions of female heroes can cause women to vastly overestimate their abilities and underestimate the difficulty of mastering masculine skills such as combat. 

They lack healthy feminine virtues to attract a man. Therefore women who emulate these popular heroes must rely on their aggressive sexuality (r-Alpha) or dominate a man into a relationship. Such unnatural role reversals create unstable relationships.

Toxic for men

Even a mans preference in women can be distorted by these gender role bending heros. Instead of looking for a woman with well developed feminine characteristics they will start to favour “men with boobs”. Instead of appreciating what's different about women and femininity, they will look for what's the same.

Men who habitually watch sexy, svelte, makeuped, well coiffured women beat up and dominate other men are conditioning their minds to accept themselves being dominated by women. They are mentally weakening themselves, taking on a subservient role and lowering their masculinity (becoming r-Betas). Since our thoughts and mental attitude can affect our hormones they may even be lowering their testosterone when they watch movies and TV shows featuring false gender narratives.

The true Female Hero Archetype can be found in our traditions

Before western culture began to be influenced by the false narratives of cultural marxism we primarily praised women for feminine virtues. We understood that men and women had different roles to play. We celebrated the differences. That wisdom is still available, if we would look for it.

For thousands of years western culture included rules to protect women and ensure that they could fulfill their biological role as wives, mothers and grand mothers. Women who expressed feminine virtues were valued and cared for. Yes life wasn't perfect for men or women however no where else in the world were women so well treated as in western societies.

Traditional female heros were praised for their femininity, wisdom, chasteness, fertility and industries. Often female heros are seen exerting a civilizing influence on men (see Beauty and the Beast). Their ability to “tame” the wild nature of men, or to bring out their best qualities is at the heart of many female hero myths.

In addition, most male heros are born to a female hero mother. In Christianity Mary plays a pivotal role in the redeeming of humanity by giving birth to the hero Jesus. As Christianity spread from the middle east and came into Europe it was significantly modified to meet european sensibilities. The story of Mary was imbued with all of the ancient traditions about ideal femininity so that she could serve as a role model for women.

The best way to discover traditional stories about femininity is to read and examine for lessons that can be applied in our own life. The story of Beauty and the Beast has lessons for both men and women. Below I will point out only the most important lessons. Please feel free to add your own and comment on your favorite parts.

Beauty and the Beast

Jeanne-Marie LePrince de Beaumont

There was once a very rich merchant, who had six children, three sons, and three daughters; being a man of sense, he spared no cost for their education, but gave them all kinds of masters. His daughters were extremely handsome, especially the youngest. When she was little everybody admired her, and called her "The little Beauty;" so that, as she grew up, she still went by the name of Beauty, which made her sisters very jealous.

  • Beauty and her siblings were raised by a good father who loved them dearly. Its interesting that he cared for their intellectual development as well. 
  • Its notable that no mother is mentioned in the story. Beauty choose to be feminine despite not having a mother to teacher how. 

The youngest, as she was handsomer, was also better than her sisters. The two eldest had a great deal of pride, because they were rich. They gave themselves ridiculous airs, and would not visit other merchants' daughters, nor keep company with any but persons of quality. They went out every day to parties of pleasure, balls, plays, concerts, and so forth, and they laughed at their youngest sister, because she spent the greatest part of her time in reading good books.

  • Please note the contrast of the virtues of Beauty (ideal developing femininity, K-Beta) and the vices of her unnamed sisters (r-Alpha). 
  • From a single familly, all raised the same way by the same parents you can have emerge both virtuous and vicious people.
  • In addition, Beauty was concerned with personal development while her sisters partied. Reading fiction books helps would help her to develop empathy and emulate feminine heros.

As it was known that they were great fortunes, several eminent merchants made their addresses to them; but the two eldest said, they would never marry, unless they could meet with a duke, or an earl at least. Beauty very civilly thanked them that courted her, and told them she was too young yet to marry, but chose to stay with her father a few years longer.

  • Beauty knows herself and that she still lacks maturity to marry, demonstrating both self knowledge and humility.

All at once the merchant lost his whole fortune, excepting a small country house at a great distance from town, and told his children with tears in his eyes, they must go there and work for their living. The two eldest answered, that they would not leave the town, for they had several lovers, who they were sure would be glad to have them, though they had no fortune; but the good ladies were mistaken, for their lovers slighted and forsook them in their poverty. As they were not beloved on account of their pride, everybody said; they do not deserve to be pitied, we are very glad to see their pride humbled, let them go and give themselves quality airs in milking the cows and minding their dairy. But, added they, we are extremely concerned for Beauty, she was such a charming, sweet-tempered creature, spoke so kindly to poor people, and was of such an affable, obliging behavior. Nay, several gentlemen would have married her, though they knew she had not a penny; but she told them she could not think of leaving her poor father in his misfortunes, but was determined to go along with him into the country to comfort and attend him. Poor Beauty at first was sadly grieved at the loss of her fortune; "but," said she to herself, "were I to cry ever so much, that would not make things better, I must try to make myself happy without a fortune."

  • The older sisters were sluts, well, actually prostitutes, who believed that their multiple lovers would pay them for their time. 
  • The older sisters also displayed a complete lack of empathy, love and in group preference for their father. Beauty however was loyal to her father and demonstrated concern for him.

When they came to their country house, the merchant and his three sons applied themselves to husbandry and tillage; and Beauty rose at four in the morning, and made haste to have the house clean, and dinner ready for the family. In the beginning she found it very difficult, for she had not been used to work as a servant, but in less than two months she grew stronger and healthier than ever. After she had done her work, she read, played on the harpsichord, or else sung whilst she spun.

  • Though never having experience doing chores Beauty quickly and happily adapted to her new, challenging life. As a result she became even better than before.
  • Though very busy she still found time for self improvement (reading, playing instruments and singing).

On the contrary, her two sisters did not know how to spend their time; they got up at ten, and did nothing but saunter about the whole day, lamenting the loss of their fine clothes and acquaintance. "Do but see our youngest sister," said they, one to the other, "what a poor, stupid, mean-spirited creature she is, to be contented with such an unhappy dismal situation."

  • Laziness and bitterness are very unfeminine and unattractive qualities.

The good merchant was of quite a different opinion; he knew very well that Beauty outshone her sisters, in her person as well as her mind, and admired her humility and industry, but above all her humility and patience; for her sisters not only left her all the work of the house to do, but insulted her every moment.

  • Jealous women are vicious and it only gets worse as the story progresses. 

The family had lived about a year in this retirement, when the merchant received a letter with an account that a vessel, on board of which he had effects, was safely arrived. This news had liked to have turned the heads of the two eldest daughters, who immediately flattered themselves with the hopes of returning to town, for they were quite weary of a country life; and when they saw their father ready to set out, they begged of him to buy them new gowns, headdresses, ribbons, and all manner of trifles; but Beauty asked for nothing for she thought to herself, that all the money her father was going to receive, would scarce be sufficient to purchase everything her sisters wanted.

  • Greedy, spendthrift women are never satisfied.
  • A good woman is concerned with not putting undue burdens on the family breadwinner to provide luxuries.

"What will you have, Beauty?" said her father.

"Since you have the goodness to think of me," answered she, "be so kind to bring me a rose, for as none grows hereabouts, they are a kind of rarity." Not that Beauty cared for a rose, but she asked for something, lest she should seem by her example to condemn her sisters' conduct, who would have said she did it only to look particular.

  • Notice the graciousness of Beauty in the first sentence.
  • A good woman is good for its own sake, not to impress others.

The good man went on his journey, but when he came there, they went to law with him about the merchandise, and after a great deal of trouble and pains to no purpose, he came back as poor as before.

He was within thirty miles of his own house, thinking on the pleasure he should have in seeing his children again, when going through a large forest he lost himself. It rained and snowed terribly; besides, the wind was so high, that it threw him twice off his horse, and night coming on, he began to apprehend being either starved to death with cold and hunger, or else devoured by the wolves, whom he heard howling all round him, when, on a sudden, looking through a long walk of trees, he saw a light at some distance, and going on a little farther perceived it came from a palace illuminated from top to bottom. The merchant returned God thanks for this happy discovery, and hastened to the place, but was greatly surprised at not meeting with anyone in the outer courts. His horse followed him, and seeing a large stable open, went in, and finding both hay and oats, the poor beast, who was almost famished, fell to eating very heartily; the merchant tied him up to the manger, and walking towards the house, where he saw no one, but entering into a large hall, he found a good fire, and a table plentifully set out with but one cover laid. As he was wet quite through with the rain and snow, he drew near the fire to dry himself. "I hope," said he, "the master of the house, or his servants will excuse the liberty I take; I suppose it will not be long before some of them appear."

He waited a considerable time, until it struck eleven, and still nobody came. At last he was so hungry that he could stay no longer, but took a chicken, and ate it in two mouthfuls, trembling all the while. After this he drank a few glasses of wine, and growing more courageous he went out of the hall, and crossed through several grand apartments with magnificent furniture, until he came into a chamber, which had an exceeding good bed in it, and as he was very much fatigued, and it was past midnight, he concluded it was best to shut the door, and go to bed.

  • The empty house. Devoid of guests, family, laughter and love is a fitting symbol of the heart and life of a single man. 

It was ten the next morning before the merchant waked, and as he was going to rise he was astonished to see a good suit of clothes in the room of his own, which were quite spoiled; certainly, said he, this palace belongs to some kind fairy, who has seen and pitied my distress. He looked through a window, but instead of snow saw the most delightful arbors, interwoven with the beautifulest flowers that were ever beheld. He then returned to the great hall, where he had supped the night before, and found some chocolate ready made on a little table. "Thank you, good Madam Fairy," said he aloud, "for being so careful, as to provide me a breakfast; I am extremely obliged to you for all your favors."

  • The father is a respectful and well mannered guest.

The good man drank his chocolate, and then went to look for his horse, but passing through an arbor of roses he remembered Beauty's request to him, and gathered a branch on which were several; immediately he heard a great noise, and saw such a frightful Beast coming towards him, that he was ready to faint away.

"You are very ungrateful," said the Beast to him, in a terrible voice; "I have saved your life by receiving you into my castle, and, in return, you steal my roses, which I value beyond anything in the universe, but you shall die for it; I give you but a quarter of an hour to prepare yourself, and say your prayers."

  • Men who spend excessive time alone can get weird and overreact, especially about their hobbies and personal property.
  • The Beast represents the natural, dangerous, aggressive, violent, “ugly” side of masculinity that undeveloped men have not yet learned to master. Make no mistake, the beast is a necessary component of a man's personality, but it must be tamed and used appropriately.

The merchant fell on his knees, and lifted up both his hands, "My lord," said he, "I beseech you to forgive me, indeed I had no intention to offend in gathering a rose for one of my daughters, who desired me to bring her one."

"My name is not My Lord," replied the monster, "but Beast; I don't love compliments, not I. I like people to speak as they think; and so do not imagine, I am to be moved by any of your flattering speeches. But you say you have got daughters. I will forgive you, on condition that one of them come willingly, and suffer for you. Let me have no words, but go about your business, and swear that if your daughter refuse to die in your stead, you will return within three months."

  • The Beast is all man, but a very socially unpolished man. No time for small talk and pleasantries, just cold hard logic. As men, if we choose to be always logical and disagreeable we may get a reputation as something of a beast.

The merchant had no mind to sacrifice his daughters to the ugly monster, but he thought, in obtaining this respite, he should have the satisfaction of seeing them once more, so he promised, upon oath, he would return, and the Beast told him he might set out when he pleased, "but," added he, "you shall not depart empty handed; go back to the room where you lay, and you will see a great empty chest; fill it with whatever you like best, and I will send it to your home," and at the same time Beast withdrew.

  • The good father is always thinking about what's best for his children, even when his life is hanging in the balance.

"Well," said the good man to himself, "if I must die, I shall have the comfort, at least, of leaving something to my poor children." He returned to the bedchamber, and finding a great quantity of broad pieces of gold, he filled the great chest the Beast had mentioned, locked it, and afterwards took his horse out of the stable, leaving the palace with as much grief as he had entered it with joy. The horse, of his own accord, took one of the roads of the forest, and in a few hours the good man was at home.

  • A good father wants to leave something for his children, a legacy.

His children came round him, but instead of receiving their embraces with pleasure, he looked on them, and holding up the branch he had in his hands, he burst into tears. "Here, Beauty," said he, "take these roses, but little do you think how dear they are like to cost your unhappy father," and then related his fatal adventure. Immediately the two eldest set up lamentable outcries, and said all manner of ill-natured things to Beauty, who did not cry at all.

  • Have you started to hate the older sisters yet?

"Do but see the pride of that little wretch," said they; "she would not ask for fine clothes, as we did; but no truly, Miss wanted to distinguish herself, so now she will be the death of our poor father, and yet she does not so much as shed a tear.

"Why should I," answered Beauty, "it would be very needless, for my father shall not suffer upon my account, since the monster will accept of one of his daughters, I will deliver myself up to all his fury, and I am very happy in thinking that my death will save my father's life, and be a proof of my tender love for him."

  • This is a great example of “soft” female bravery. Willing to sacrifice herself for her loved ones, with no chance of survival.  

"No, sister," said her three brothers, "that shall not be, we will go find the monster, and either kill him, or perish in the attempt."

  • This is a great example of “hard” masculine bravery. Men willing to face the danger or die trying. Aside from the older sisters the father raise some fine children.

"Do not imagine any such thing, my sons," said the merchant, "Beast's power is so great, that I have no hopes of your overcoming him. I am charmed with Beauty's kind and generous offer, but I cannot yield to it. I am old, and have not long to live, so can only lose a few years, which I regret for your sakes alone, my dear children.

"Indeed father," said Beauty, "you shall not go to the palace without me, you cannot hinder me from following you." It was to no purpose all they could say. Beauty still insisted on setting out for the fine palace, and her sisters were delighted at it, for her virtue and amiable qualities made them envious and jealous.

  • Please notice how Beauty disagrees with her father. She doesn't do it in a competitive or antagonistic way. She is not challenging him. Still, she resolutely sticks to her principles.

The merchant was so afflicted at the thoughts of losing his daughter, that he had quite forgot the chest full of gold, but at night when he retired to rest, no sooner had he shut his chamber door, than, to his great astonishment, he found it by his bedside; he was determined, however, not to tell his children, that he was grown rich, because they would have wanted to return to town, and he was resolved not to leave the country; but he trusted Beauty with the secret, who informed him, that two gentlemen came in his absence, and courted her sisters; she begged her father to consent to their marriage, and give them fortunes, for she was so good, that she loved them and forgave heartily all their ill usage. These wicked creatures rubbed their eyes with an onion to force some tears when they parted with their sister, but her brothers were really concerned. Beauty was the only one who did not shed tears at parting, because she would not increase their uneasiness.

The horse took the direct road to the palace, and towards evening they perceived it illuminated as at first. The horse went of himself into the stable, and the good man and his daughter came into the great hall, where they found a table splendidly served up, and two covers. The merchant had no heart to eat, but Beauty, endeavoring to appear cheerful, sat down to table, and helped him. "Afterwards," thought she to herself, "Beast surely has a mind to fatten me before he eats me, since he provides such plentiful entertainment." When they had supped they heard a great noise, and the merchant, all in tears, bid his poor child, farewell, for he thought Beast was coming. Beauty was sadly terrified at his horrid form, but she took courage as well as she could, and the monster having asked her if she came willingly; "ye -- e -- es," said she, trembling.

  • Despite the difficult circumstances Beauty works hard to be cheerful, pleasant and to care for her father. She isn't the master of the situation, but she is the master of her response to the situation. She demonstrates tremendous agency in this encounter.
  • She wisely assesses the dangerous situation and acts accordingly. 

The beast responded, "You are very good, and I am greatly obliged to you; honest man, go your ways tomorrow morning, but never think of coming here again."

"Farewell Beauty, farewell Beast," answered he, and immediately the monster withdrew. "Oh, daughter," said the merchant, embracing Beauty, "I am almost frightened to death, believe me, you had better go back, and let me stay here."

"No, father," said Beauty, in a resolute tone, "you shall set out tomorrow morning, and leave me to the care and protection of providence." They went to bed, and thought they should not close their eyes all night; but scarce were they laid down, than they fell fast asleep, and Beauty dreamed, a fine lady came, and said to her, "I am content, Beauty, with your good will, this good action of yours in giving up your own life to save your father's shall not go unrewarded." Beauty waked, and told her father her dream, and though it helped to comfort him a little, yet he could not help crying bitterly, when he took leave of his dear child.

  • The woman who appears is essentially the fairy from Pinocchio and many other fairy tales. She represents the feminine personified, nature and natural consequences. In a way we can say that nature is pleased with Beauty for fulfilling her feminine role.

As soon as he was gone, Beauty sat down in the great hall, and fell a crying likewise; but as she was mistress of a great deal of resolution, she recommended herself to God, and resolved not to be uneasy the little time she had to live; for she firmly believed Beast would eat her up that night.

  • Wow, just wow. What a lady.

However, she thought she might as well walk about until then, and view this fine castle, which she could not help admiring; it was a delightful pleasant place, and she was extremely surprised at seeing a door, over which was written, "Beauty's Apartment." She opened it hastily, and was quite dazzled with the magnificence that reigned throughout; but what chiefly took up her attention, was a large library, a harpsichord, and several music books. "Well," said she to herself, "I see they will not let my time hang heavy upon my hands for want of amusement." Then she reflected, "Were I but to stay here a day, there would not have been all these preparations." This consideration inspired her with fresh courage; and opening the library she took a book, and read these words, in letters of gold:

  • The Beast has prepared his heart (as symbolized by his castle) for Beauty.
  • Men, if you are going to buy a woman a give, make sure it's something she likes. At least the Beast has the empathy to know what it is that Beauty values and enjoys. 

Welcome Beauty, banish fear,
You are queen and mistress here.
Speak your wishes, speak your will,
Swift obedience meets them still.

"Alas," said she, with a sigh, "there is nothing I desire so much as to see my poor father, and know what he is doing." She had no sooner said this, when casting her eyes on a great looking glass, to her great amazement, she saw her own home, where her father arrived with a very dejected countenance. Her sisters went to meet him, and notwithstanding their endeavors to appear sorrowful, their joy, felt for having got rid of their sister, was visible in every feature. A moment after, everything disappeared, and Beauty's apprehensions at this proof of Beast's complaisance.

At noon she found dinner ready, and while at table, was entertained with an excellent concert of music, though without seeing anybody. But at night, as she was going to sit down to supper, she heard the noise Beast made, and could not help being sadly terrified. "Beauty," said the monster, "will you give me leave to see you sup?"

"That is as you please," answered Beauty trembling.

"No," replied the Beast, "you alone are mistress here; you need only bid me gone, if my presence is troublesome, and I will immediately withdraw. But, tell me, do not you think me very ugly?"

  • A gentleman tries to avoid making a woman feel deeply unsafe or uncomfortable.

"That is true," said Beauty, "for I cannot tell a lie, but I believe you are very good natured."

  • Honesty and graciousness.

"So I am," said the monster, "but then, besides my ugliness, I have no sense; I know very well, that I am a poor, silly, stupid creature."

"'Tis no sign of folly to think so," replied Beauty, "for never did fool know this, or had so humble a conceit of his own understanding."

  • Beauty displays great wisdom by building up her man.

"Eat then, Beauty," said the monster, "and endeavor to amuse yourself in your palace, for everything here is yours, and I should be very uneasy, if you were not happy."

  • Our womans happiness makes us happy.

"You are very obliging," answered Beauty, "I am pleased with your kindness, and when I consider that, your deformity scarce appears."

"Yes, yes," said the Beast, "my heart is good, but still I am a monster."

  • A wise man knows that deep down, in his heart lies a dangerous monster. Some men are embarrassed at this.

"Among mankind," says Beauty, "there are many that deserve that name more than you, and I prefer you, just as you are, to those, who, under a human form, hide a treacherous, corrupt, and ungrateful heart."

  • Beauty complements her man, praises good virtue signals her disdain for evil.

"If I had sense enough," replied the Beast, "I would make a fine compliment to thank you, but I am so dull, that I can only say, I am greatly obliged to you."

  • In the presence of a women they are attracted to many men lose their wit and ability to speak cleverly. This is fairly normal.

Beauty ate a hearty supper, and had almost conquered her dread of the monster; but she had like to have fainted away, when he said to her, "Beauty, will you be my wife?"

  • Beast gets to the point. Why wait to ask?

She was some time before she dared answer, for she was afraid of making him angry, if she refused. At last, however, she said trembling, "no Beast." Immediately the poor monster went to sigh, and hissed so frightfully, that the whole palace echoed. But Beauty soon recovered her fright, for Beast having said, in a mournful voice, "then farewell, Beauty," left the room; and only turned back, now and then, to look at her as he went out.

When Beauty was alone, she felt a great deal of compassion for poor Beast. "Alas," said she, "'tis thousand pities, anything so good natured should be so ugly."

Beauty spent three months very contentedly in the palace. Every evening Beast paid her a visit, and talked to her, during supper, very rationally, with plain good common sense, but never with what the world calls wit; and Beauty daily discovered some valuable qualifications in the monster, and seeing him often had so accustomed her to his deformity, that, far from dreading the time of his visit, she would often look on her watch to see when it would be nine, for the Beast never missed coming at that hour. There was but one thing that gave Beauty any concern, which was, that every night, before she went to bed, the monster always asked her, if she would be his wife. One day she said to him, "Beast, you make me very uneasy, I wish I could consent to marry you, but I am too sincere to make you believe that will ever happen; I shall always esteem you as a friend, endeavor to be satisfied with this."

  • Keep asking unless she leaves. She likes you, but something is holding her back.

"I must," said the Beast, "for, alas! I know too well my own misfortune, but then I love you with the tenderest affection. However, I ought to think myself happy, that you will stay here; promise me never to leave me."

Beauty blushed at these words; she had seen in her glass, that her father had pined himself sick for the loss of her, and she longed to see him again. "I could," answered she, "indeed, promise never to leave you entirely, but I have so great a desire to see my father, that I shall fret to death, if you refuse me that satisfaction."

"I had rather die myself," said the monster, "than give you the least uneasiness. I will send you to your father, you shall remain with him, and poor Beast will die with grief."

  • Remember to honour your romantic partner's previous family ties.

"No," said Beauty, weeping, "I love you too well to be the cause of your death. I give you my promise to return in a week. You have shown me that my sisters are married, and my brothers gone to the army; only let me stay a week with my father, as he is alone."

"You shall be there tomorrow morning," said the Beast, "but remember your promise. You need only lay your ring on a table before you go to bed, when you have a mind to come back. Farewell Beauty." Beast sighed, as usual, bidding her goodnight, and Beauty went to bed very sad at seeing him so afflicted. When she waked the next morning, she found herself at her father's, and having rung a little bell, that was by her bedside, she saw the maid come, who, the moment she saw her, gave a loud shriek, at which the good man ran up stairs, and thought he should have died with joy to see his dear daughter again. He held her fast locked in his arms above a quarter of an hour. As soon as the first transports were over, Beauty began to think of rising, and was afraid she had no clothes to put on; but the maid told her, that she had just found, in the next room, a large trunk full of gowns, covered with gold and diamonds. Beauty thanked good Beast for his kind care, and taking one of the plainest of them, she intended to make a present of the others to her sisters. She scarce had said so when the trunk disappeared. Her father told her, that Beast insisted on her keeping them herself, and immediately both gowns and trunk came back again.

  • Don't give away a present made from love.

Beauty dressed herself, and in the meantime they sent to her sisters who hastened thither with their husbands. They were both of them very unhappy. The eldest had married a gentleman, extremely handsome indeed, but so fond of his own person, that he was full of nothing but his own dear self, and neglected his wife. The second had married a man of wit, but he only made use of it to plague and torment everybody, and his wife most of all. Beauty's sisters sickened with envy, when they saw her dressed like a princess, and more beautiful than ever, nor could all her obliging affectionate behavior stifle their jealousy, which was ready to burst when she told them how happy she was. They went down into the garden to vent it in tears; and said one to the other, in what way is this little creature better than us, that she should be so much happier? "Sister," said the oldest, "a thought just strikes my mind; let us endeavor to detain her above a week, and perhaps the silly monster will be so enraged at her for breaking her word, that he will devour her."

  • Greedy, bitter sluts might still get married, but it's not going to turn out well for them. Also, they are not a new phenomenon. 
  • Don't let jealous people ruin your romance.
  • Physical attractiveness and wit increase a man's SMV, unless he's got other serious defects.

"Right, sister," answered the other, "therefore we must show her as much kindness as possible." After they had taken this resolution, they went up, and behaved so affectionately to their sister, that poor Beauty wept for joy. When the week was expired, they cried and tore their hair, and seemed so sorry to part with her, that she promised to stay a week longer.

In the meantime, Beauty could not help reflecting on herself, for the uneasiness she was likely to cause poor Beast, whom she sincerely loved, and really longed to see again. The tenth night she spent at her father's, she dreamed she was in the palace garden, and that she saw Beast extended on the grass plat, who seemed just expiring, and, in a dying voice, reproached her with her ingratitude. Beauty started out of her sleep, and bursting into tears. "Am I not very wicked," said she, "to act so unkindly to Beast, that has studied so much, to please me in everything? Is it his fault if he is so ugly, and has so little sense? He is kind and good, and that is sufficient. Why did I refuse to marry him? I should be happier with the monster than my sisters are with their husbands; it is neither wit, nor a fine person, in a husband, that makes a woman happy, but virtue, sweetness of temper, and complaisance, and Beast has all these valuable qualifications. It is true, I do not feel the tenderness of affection for him, but I find I have the highest gratitude, esteem, and friendship; I will not make him miserable, were I to be so ungrateful I should never forgive myself." Beauty having said this, rose, put her ring on the table, and then laid down again; scarce was she in bed before she fell asleep, and when she waked the next morning, she was overjoyed to find herself in the Beast's palace.

  • Beauty has empathy and self knowledge, developed from self reflection.
  • No man is perfect, but some men are far closer to it than others. Sometimes a little reflection on what we have can help us to appreciate it more.

She put on one of her richest suits to please him, and waited for evening with the utmost impatience, at last the wished-for hour came, the clock struck nine, yet no Beast appeared. Beauty then feared she had been the cause of his death; she ran crying and wringing her hands all about the palace, like one in despair; after having sought for him everywhere, she recollected her dream, and flew to the canal in the garden, where she dreamed she saw him. There she found poor Beast stretched out, quite senseless, and, as she imagined, dead. She threw herself upon him without any dread, and finding his heart beat still, she fetched some water from the canal, and poured it on his head. Beast opened his eyes, and said to Beauty, "You forgot your promise, and I was so afflicted for having lost you, that I resolved to starve myself, but since I have the happiness of seeing you once more, I die satisfied."

  • Dress up for your man.

"No, dear Beast," said Beauty, "you must not die. Live to be my husband; from this moment I give you my hand, and swear to be none but yours. Alas! I thought I had only a friendship for you, but the grief I now feel convinces me, that I cannot live without you." Beauty scarce had pronounced these words, when she saw the palace sparkle with light; and fireworks, instruments of music, everything seemed to give notice of some great event. But nothing could fix her attention; she turned to her dear Beast, for whom she trembled with fear; but how great was her surprise! Beast was disappeared, and she saw, at her feet, one of the loveliest princes that eye ever beheld; who returned her thanks for having put an end to the charm, under which he had so long resembled a Beast. Though this prince was worthy of all her attention, she could not forbear asking where Beast was.

  • Her love killed the old beastly man and he was reborn a new man, better for it.

"You see him at your feet, said the prince. A wicked fairy had condemned me to remain under that shape until a beautiful virgin should consent to marry me. The fairy likewise enjoined me to conceal my understanding. There was only you in the world generous enough to be won by the goodness of my temper, and in offering you my crown I can't discharge the obligations I have to you."

  • (I think that in this story “wicked fairy” = horrible mother. Please tell me if you think that's a reasonable interpretation.)
  • Hurra! for magical virgins!

Beauty, agreeably surprised, gave the charming prince her hand to rise; they went together into the castle, and Beauty was overjoyed to find, in the great hall, her father and his whole family, whom the beautiful lady, that appeared to her in her dream, had conveyed thither.

  • The “beautiful lady” is what Beauty has now become. It symbolizes her becoming a compleat women (K-Alpha).

"Beauty," said this lady, "come and receive the reward of your judicious choice; you have preferred virtue before either wit or beauty, and deserve to find a person in whom all these qualifications are united. You are going to be a great queen. I hope the throne will not lessen your virtue, or make you forget yourself. As to you, ladies," said the fairy to Beauty's two sisters, "I know your hearts, and all the malice they contain. Become two statues, but, under this transformation, still retain your reason. You shall stand before your sister's palace gate, and be it your punishment to behold her happiness; and it will not be in your power to return to your former state, until you own your faults, but I am very much afraid that you will always remain statues. Pride, anger, gluttony, and idleness are sometimes conquered, but the conversion of a malicious and envious mind is a kind of miracle."

  • Virtue > wit or beauty. On the other hand, having all three is by far the best.
  • You get the mate you deserve.
  • Becoming a “Queen” a wife and mother can make a woman forget her virtues if she takes it for granted.
  • The sisters tried to kill the Beast. They conspired to ruin their sisters happiness. That's not minor vices, it's evil. Truly evil people rarely ever change and the best thing to do is view them as if they have turned to stone. I see this as a metaphor for her Defooing some toxic relatives in order to have a happy marriage.

Immediately the fairy gave a stroke with her wand, and in a moment all that were in the hall were transported into the prince's dominions. His subjects received him with joy. He married Beauty, and lived with her many years, and their happiness -- as it was founded on virtue -- was complete.

  • A marriage founded on virtue is solid.

Note: Unfortunately this version fails to mention the antidote about the Beast's home being neglected and his garden slowly dying prior to Beauty coming to live with him. I think it was a great metaphor for how a good woman's presence can enliven a man's heart and help him to remember the importance of emotions.

Conclusion

Great wisdom is to be found in many of our traditional stories. Seek out your favourites, read them and use them to stimulate your thinking. Examining a romantic story like we just did helps us to understand the truth behind romance and courtship. 

What was your favorite part of the story? Did I miss anything interesting? Did I misunderstand something? Please share with us your take on Beauty and the Beast.

Raise your SMV by slaying dragons: The Legend of St. George and the Dragon [Hero's journey]

Raise your SMV by slaying dragons: The Legend of St. George and the Dragon [Hero's journey]

Be a Romantic Hero! - Your Hero's Journey: Act 3 [Hero's journey]

Be a Romantic Hero! - Your Hero's Journey: Act 3 [Hero's journey]